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Julia and her daughter Annabella, age 5, at a park in Norwich.

Julia, 33, was raised in an abusive household and she entered foster care at the age of 9. Julia’s mother was mentally ill and her father was sent to prison. As a teenager, Julia began suffering from depression. Lonely and in search of company, Julia entered a six-year, often-abusive relationship when she was only 13 years old. By the time she was 15, Julia had moved in with her older sister who became her foster parent. Julia’s depression got worse, she started self-medicating with cannabis and at age 17 dropped out of school. Two years later, her mother suddenly died and Julia found life increasingly unbearable. She contemplated suicide but didn’t seek help for her depression. Then Julia met Richard with whom she has shared a relationship that continues 14 years later.

During what Julia describes as a traumatic period three years ago, she and Richard were arrested in a domestic dispute. The couple, by this time parents to a two year old daughter called Annabella, lost their apartment and Julia once again moved in with her sister, taking Annabella with her. The Department of Children and Families (DCF) were alerted and encouraged Julia to seek the assistance of the Supportive Housing program. In November 2014, Julia was introduced to Rose who became her case manager at the program. By January 2015, Rose had helped Julia secure an apartment subsidised by Supportive Housing. Rose offered emotional and material support, using funds to help Julia furnish her new home that was close to amenities including a park and laundromat.

Rose introduced Julia to United Community Family Services who provided bus passes, signed her up with social security, disability allowance, state cash-assistance, counselling and medication-management. Never having lived with the support of a stable family means that Julia relies on Rose and appreciates the help that she provides. Julia is now rebuilding he
Copyright
Tom Pietrasik
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5760x3840 / 4.4MB
Contained in galleries
HOUSING & THE WELFARE OF SINGLE MOTHERS
Julia and her daughter Annabella, age 5, at a park in Norwich.<br />
<br />
Julia, 33, was raised in an abusive household and she entered foster care at the age of 9. Julia’s mother was mentally ill and her father was sent to prison. As a teenager, Julia began suffering from depression. Lonely and in search of company, Julia entered a six-year, often-abusive relationship when she was only 13 years old. By the time she was 15, Julia had moved in with her older sister who became her foster parent. Julia’s depression got worse, she started self-medicating with cannabis and at age 17 dropped out of school. Two years later, her mother suddenly died and Julia found life increasingly unbearable. She contemplated suicide but didn’t seek help for her depression. Then Julia met Richard with whom she has shared a relationship that continues 14 years later. <br />
<br />
During what Julia describes as a traumatic period three years ago, she and Richard were arrested in a domestic dispute. The couple, by this time parents to a two year old daughter called Annabella, lost their apartment and Julia once again moved in with her sister, taking Annabella with her. The Department of Children and Families (DCF) were alerted and encouraged Julia to seek the assistance of the Supportive Housing program. In November 2014, Julia was introduced to Rose who became her case manager at the program. By January 2015, Rose had helped Julia secure an apartment subsidised by Supportive Housing. Rose offered emotional and material support, using funds to help Julia furnish her new home that was close to amenities including a park and laundromat. <br />
<br />
Rose introduced Julia to United Community Family Services who provided bus passes, signed her up with social security, disability allowance, state cash-assistance, counselling and medication-management. Never having lived with the support of a stable family means that Julia relies on Rose and appreciates the help that she provides. Julia is now rebuilding he